DR. ELLA BEEN

DR. ELLA BEEN

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENTT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, FACULTY OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

CURRICULUM VITAE

 

  • Professional Experience:
    Dr. Been is a physical therapist and an expert in the treatment and rehabilitation of children with developmental problems.  She engages in interdisciplinary research that combines the clinical knowledge of a physiotherapist with anatomical knowledge and an understanding of human evolution in an attempt to reconstruct how humans stood and walked during prehistoric times.

 

  • Education:
    2010: Post-doctoral appointment, Department of Physical Therapy, Ben-Gurion University.
    2006: Ph.D. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University.  
    1990: B.P.T. in physical therapy, Tel Aviv University (summa cum laude)

 

  • Subjects Taught:
    Anatomy of the human body, including applied anatomy and dissection, kinesiology, theory of movement, diagnosis and treatment of posture problems. Development of typical and atypical children. Manual treatment methods for physiotherapy.

 

  • Research Interests:
    Spinal anatomy, development, pathology and evolution; functional, evolutionary and pathological aspects of stability; human evolution, with an emphasis on the transition to bipedal locomotion.‎

 

  • Publications:
    1. Been E, and Kalichman L. 2014. Lumbar lordosis. The Spine Journal 14:87-97.‎
           
    2.‎‎ Shefi S, Soudack M, Konen E, and Been E. 2013. Development of the Lumbar Lordotic Curvature in Children From Age 2 to 20 Years. Spine 38(10):E602-E608.

           
    3. Been E, Gomez A, and Kramer PA. 2012. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 147:64–77.‎‎
     

    4. Been E, Li L, Hunter DJ, and Kalichman L. 2011. Geometry of the vertebral bodies and the intervertebral discs in lumbar segments adjacent to spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis: pilot study. European Spine Journal 20(7):1159-1165.
           
    5. Been E, Peleg S, Marom A, and Barash A. 2010. Morphology and Function of the Lumbar Spine of the Kebara 2 Neandertal. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 142(4):549-557.

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